SUSE Linux Essentials – Where are the compilers? Understanding the Development Tools Module

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Compilers on SUSE Linux

If you are new to SUSE Linux, you might have wondered why the C compiler on the system is so old. For example, on a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 system running on X86-64, the default gcc is version 4.8-6.189! Why isn’t the C compiler a newer version, like gcc version 8?

A SUSE Linux system can have multiple versions of the gcc compiler. The first type of compiler, the one used to compile the version of SUSE Linux that you are running, is known as the “System Compiler”. The “System Compiler” usually does not change throughout the life of the SLES version because changing it would greatly complicate creating patches to maintain the operating system. For example, gcc 4.8 is the SLES 12 “System Compiler” used to compile all SLES 12 releases including all Service Packs.  gcc 7-3.3.22 is the “System Compiler” for SLES 15.

The other type of compilers available on SLES are known as a “Toolchain Compilers”. These are the primary compilers for application development and are periodically updated with patches and new stable compiler versions as they become available. Usually there is more than one version available at any point in time. Most developers want to use newer compilers for application development because they provide additional optimization and functionality.

Installing the newer “Toolchain” compilers is easy, but first you must understand a little about the SUSE Linux Modules concept.

SUSE Linux Modules Introduction

SUSE introduced the concept of operating system Modules in SLES 12. SLES Modules are groups of packages with similar use cases and support status that are grouped together into a Module and delivered via a unique repository. SUSE introduced the Module concept to allow delivery of the latest technology in areas of rapid innovation without having to wait for the next SLES Service Pack. SUSE fully maintains and supports the Modules through your SUSE Linux subscription.

With the introduction of SLES 15, Modules have become even more important because the entire SUSE Linux OS is packaged as modules. The SLES 15 installation media consists of a unified Installer and a minimal system for deploying, updating, and registering SUSE Linux Enterprise Server or other SUSE products. Even the ls and ps commands are part of “Basesystem Module 15” module in SLES 15.

During deployment you can add functionality by selecting modules and extensions to be installed. The availability of certain modules or extensions depends on the product you chose in the first step of this installation. For example, in SLES 15, the HPC Module is only available if you selected the SUSE Linux Enterprise for HPC product during the initial installation.

INstall_select_Modules_15_Inverted

SUSE Linux Modules enable you to install just the set of packages required for the machine’s purpose, making the system lean, fast, and more secure. This modular packaging approach also makes it easy to provide tailor-made images for container and cloud environments. Modules can be added or removed at any time during the lifecycle of the system, allowing you to easily adjust the system to changing requirements. See the Modules Quick Start Guide for more information.

Please note that just activating a Module does not install the packages from that Module—you need to do that separately after activating a Module.  To use a package from a Module generally requires two steps: 1) activating the Module and 2) installing the desired packages.  Some Modules are pre-activated based on the product you installed. For example, the HPC Module is automatically activated when you install SUSE Linux for High Performance Computing 15.

The Development Tools Module is the SLES 15 Module that includes the most recent compilers such as gcc, debuggers, and other development tools (over 500 packages for SLES 15). The Toolchain Module provided access to newer compilers for SLES 12.

Activating the Development Tools Module using YaST

  1. Start YaST.                                                    # Requires root privileges
  2. Click Add System Extensions or Modules.

Install_Software_Management

  1. Select Development Tools Module.

Install_select_Development_tools

  1. Press Next to start the activation process for the Development Tools Module

Installing a package (gcc8) from the Development Tools Module

Once the Development Tools Module is activated, you can install packages from the Module. This example uses gcc8.

  1. Start YaST and click Software then Software management

Yast_Software Management

  1. Type gcc8 in the search field and click Search.

YaST_Search_gcc8

  1. Select gcc8 and click Accept.

The gcc8 compiler will now be installed.

YaST_Gcc_8_installed

And that’s it! You have successfully activated the Development Tools Module and installed gcc8.

Activating the Development Tools Module on SLES 15 using the command line

Now let’s take a different approach and use the command line to perform the same tasks. You will need to have root privileges to perform most of these steps either by su to root or using sudo.

  1. Activate the Development Tools Module.
sudo SUSEConnect -p sle-module-development-tools/15/x86_64

CMD_Out_SUSEConnect_activate_Devtools

  1. Verify that the Development Tools Module is activated.
sudo SUSEConnect –l

CMD_Out_suseconnect-l

In this example, the BaseSystem, Development Tools, Desktop Applications, and Web and Scripting Modules are activated. The other Modules and Extensions are available for activation.

  1. Check the status of gcc on this system.
zypper search gcc

CMD_Out_zypper_search_gcc.png

You can see that the system C compiler is gcc7 and is installed (i)  and gcc8 is available for installation.

  1. Install the gcc8 compiler.
sudo zypper install gcc8      # Must be root

CMD_Out_zypper+install_gcc8

  1. Verify that the gcc8 compiler was installed

zypper search gcc8

CMD_Out_zypper_search_gcc8

  1. Check the gcc8 version.
gcc-8 –version

CMD_Out_gcc8--version

Summary

You should now understand how to activate a SUSE Module and install a package from the module. This same approach can be applied to the other SUSE Modules, such as the HPC Module. Modules are a key concept of SUSE product packaging, particularly for SLES 15.

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The ibmvnic driver with SR-IOV is now supported by SLES 12 and SLES 15 on IBM POWER9 processor-based systems

green_networkSUSE has worked with IBM to enable support for the ibmvnic driver with PowerVM on POWER9 systems.

The ibmvnic driver enables PowerVM Single Root I/O Virtualizations (SR-IOV) for improved network capabilities including reduced systems processor utilization, decreased network latency, and enforcement of network Quality of Service.

Supported SLES Levels:

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 3 (SLES 12 SP3)
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 Service Pack 4 (SLES 12 SP4)
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15

Supported Hardware:

  • All IBM POWER9 processor-based systems using PowerVM virtualization

IBM and SUSE strongly recommend customers apply the latest maintenance updates to SLES, PowerVM, and the latest firmware level for the POWER9 hardware before using ibmvnic.

Customers should not attempt installation of SLES 12 SP3 over an ibmvnic network.

Please NOTE: ibmvnic is not supported on POWER8 systems. Ibmvnic is a technology preview on POWER8 based systems.

Full details are in the SUSE TID at https://www.suse.com/support/kb/doc/?id=7023703

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SUSE Linux for Arm is now available for all customers

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SUSE Arm products available to all

Subscriptions for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm and SUSE Manager Lifecycle for Arm are now available directly to customers through the Corporate price list or through the SUSE Shop https://www.suse.com/shop/

Previously, SUSE subscriptions for the Arm hardware platforms were only available to SUSE Partners due to the relative immaturity of the Arm server platform. Now that we have delivered four releases of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm and have customers running SUSE Linux on Arm servers as diverse as the tiny Raspberry Pi and the high performance HPE Apollo 70 servers, we are now ready to sell subscriptions directly to customers.

Diversity of Arm: An Advantage and Challenge

As you can see from the chart below, SUSE has enabled a number of different Arm System-On-a-Chip (SOC) processors. One of the major advantages of the Arm platform compared to other platforms is the huge diversity of processors and processor features.

Each Arm licensee has great freedom to create their own System-On-a-Chip (SoC) engineered with the I/O, memory bandwidth, and number of processor cores needed for a specific workload. The number of processor cores varies from 1 processor to 48 processors per core. A single Arm SoC can have multiple varieties, such as the Marvel OcteonTX that is available in with 1 to 24 cores.

sles15_arm_enablement

Beyond socket-based pricing

The ability to create Arm SoCs with just the right I/O and number of processor cores needed for a particular workload is one of the largest advantages of the Arm platform, but it is also a pricing challenge for software vendors such as SUSE.

Software pricing should:

  • Reflect the value the customer receives from the software
  • Be as simple and easy to understand as possible

Both goals are essential, but sometimes difficult to achieve. For example, the value of a high availability solution that reduces system outages might be much more valuable to an airline than it would be to a small retail shop due to the difference in the number of people and revenue affected by an outage.

Software vendors have traditionally priced software based on the amount of processing capability available to the application (or Operating System). The underlying concept is that the more capacity, the higher the value, and therefore the higher the price.

For example, on a UNIX hardware platform such as IBM Power, IBM software cost is based on the number of processor cores and the relative performance of each core-something IBM calls the Processor Value Unit (PVU). Oracle has a similar approach called the Core Factor.  The underlying concept is simple: the bigger the system, the greater the value to the customer and thus, the more expensive the software. Unfortunately, both of these approaches are relatively complex.

By contrast, software pricing in the commodity Linux server market has traditionally used a much simpler measure of capacity: processor sockets. The more sockets in a server, the higher the software costs. Most SUSE software subscriptions are based on increments of 1-2 sockets of processing capacity. For example, subscriptions for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server on X86 servers have a U.S. list price of $799 per socket pair. If you have a four-socket server, then you would need two 1-2 socket subscriptions for a total list price of $1,598.

The traditional socket-based pricing goes back many years, when each socket might have only a single processor core. Although this pricing model is very simple, it doesn’t fit well to the diversity of systems based on Arm SoCs where a single socket can hold a single, low performance Arm core or 48 (or more) high performance cores.

Hybrid pricing for SUSE products on Arm

SUSE needed a pricing approach for SUSE Linux and other products for the Arm platform that could be used for very small systems such as the Raspberry Pi and for huge systems such as the HPE Apollo 70. The pricing approach also needed to be simple to understand. Ultimately, we decided to use a model that has core-based pricing for lower end Arm hardware and socket-based pricing for everything else.

The new pricing for SUSE Linux Enterprise for Arm is tied to the number of processor cores in a server. Servers with less than 16 cores are priced based on the number of groups of 4 processor cores. Each group of 4 cores, up to 15 cores, requires a 4-core group subscription that is stackable to a maximum 4 subscriptions. The number of cores is rounded up to the nearest group of 4 cores, therefore a server with 10 cores would require three 4-core group subscriptions.

Servers with 16 or more cores use the traditional 1-2 socket-based pricing.

This hybrid pricing model applies to SUSE products for Arm that have traditionally used socket-based pricing, such as the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for Arm and SUSE Manager Lifecycle. Other SUSE products such as SUSE Enterprise Storage uses server-based pricing and do not use this hybrid pricing.

Hybrid pricing examples for SUSE products on Arm

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B has 4 Broadcom processor cores. Because the total number of cores in the server is less than 16 cores, you use the 4-core group-based pricing.

arm pricing examples-rpi

NXP LS2085A

Systems based on the NXP LS2085A have 8 processor cores. Because the total number of cores in the server is less than 16 cores, you use the 4-core group-based pricing.

arm pricing examples-ls2085

Marvell OcteonTX

Systems based on the Marvell Octeon TX can have from 1 to 24 processor cores. In this example, we use a 14 core Octeon TX processor. Because the total number of cores in this server is less than 16 cores, you use the 4-core group-based pricing. This example also demonstrates how the number of cores is rounded up to the nearest integer multiple of 4.

arm pricing examples-octeontx

HPE Apollo 70

The HPE Apollo 70 is based on the Marvell ThunderX2 which can have from 16-32 processors per socket. In this example we use an HPE Apollo 70 dual socket server with 32 processor cores per socket for a total of 64 cores in this system. Because the server is greater than 15 cores, you use the 1-2 socket pricing.

arm pricing examples-apollo70

Summary

The diversity of the Arm server platform requires a more sophisticated pricing model than the simplistic socket-based approach. The new hybrid pricing model strikes a balance by using a core-based approach for smaller systems while retaining the traditional socket-based approach for larger servers.

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Success Story: Using SUSE Linux for Arm with the Raspberry Pi to transform manufacturing

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Knorr-Bremse, a long time SUSE customer, is deploying SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm (SLES for Arm) to transform their manufacturing operations with a goal of improving productivity, reducing downtime, and improving factory floor operations. The solution success story can be found here: https://www.suse.com/c/success/knorr-bremse-ag/

Knorr-Bremse is a German manufacturer of a variety of rail and commercial vehicle components including brakes, door systems, and air conditioning systems. Knorr-Bremse employs over 27,000 workers around the world.

Knorr-Bremse had a problem. Many of their manufacturing machines have service lives of up to 30 years.  Some older machines are not instrumented for remote monitoring, resulting in manufacturing outages and other problems. Knorr-Bremse needed to make their manufacturing operations “smarter” to improve production efficiency and reduce downtime.

The Raspberry Pi single-board-computers were a logical choice for a monitoring hardware platform due to their low cost, easy availability, and the wide variety of I/O sensing devices that are available. Knorr-Bremse experimented with Raspberry Pi devices running the community supported Raspbian operating system, but they soon concluded that they needed an enterprise operating system as part of their solution.

Knorr-Bremse needed an operating system that was secure and reliable. Since the Raspberry Pi-based monitoring systems would be running inside of their corporate network, security was a big concern. Because these systems were key to improving manufacturing efficiency, the systems also had to be reliable. They needed the operating system to be commercially supported, so that they could receive fixes and assistance resolving any operating system problems that might arise. Finally, they wanted a commercially supported management platform to deliver updates to these systems.

Knorr-Bremse seized on the commercial support of SUSE Linux on Raspberry Pi single-board computers as a cost-efficient way to add monitoring to their manufacturing. The solution consists of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm (SLES for Arm) running on Raspberry Pi 3 Model B single-board computers with management services provided by SUSE Manager.

Their monitoring solution also includes a number of custom built I/O boards that attach to the Raspberry Pi I/O ports to sense different operational factors such as temperature and machine status. These Raspberry Pi-based systems are IoT gateways that gather information and send that information to a centralized manufacturing operations team. Some of the Raspberry Pi systems include touch screens that simplify communications from manufacturing workers.

Although Knorr-Bremse is early in the process of deploying this solution to their manufacturing plants, the initial results made them confident enough to release this success story.

SUSE has a number of manufacturing and government agency customers implementing monitoring solutions based on SLES for Arm on the Raspberry Pi systems. All of them leverage the security and reliability of SUSE Linux as well as the SUSE Manager to deliver a monitoring solution that can be distributed in a wide range of environments. SLES for Arm on the Raspberry Pi uses the same common code base used for SLES on X86, Power, and mainframe servers. SUSE provides a SD-Card image with customers and use to quickly install SLES on the Raspberry Pi.

Customers can experiment with SLES for Arm on Raspberry Pi devices by using a free 60 day trial version of SLES for Arm: https://www.suse.com/products/server/download/.

Information on how developers can obtain a free Developer License for SLES for Arm can also be found here: https://www.suse.com/c/free-developer-subscriptions-for-suse-linux-on-arm-based-systems-are-now-available/

SUSE looks forward to helping other customers solve difficult problems using SUSE Linux with Raspberry Pi and other small devices. The combination of enterprise Linux with extremely low cost hardware can enable solutions to problems that previously were impractical to address.

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SUSE supports innovative High Performance and Edge Computing cross-industry initiative

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As the creator of the first commercially supported enterprise Linux distribution, SUSE is no stranger to open source innovation or working with partners to achieve industry goals.

SUSE is proud to join the Forschungszentrum Jülich research institute, Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems, Huawei, Mellanox, and E4 in a new initiative to develop open ecosystems for High Performance and Edge Computing.  This initiative brings together end users and solution providers to accelerate adoption of new technologies for HPC and Edge computing workloads including deployments of 5G networks.

SUSE contributions to this initiative will leverage our experience delivering three versions of our commercially supported Linux distribution for Arm. SUSE supports a variety of 64-bit Arm System-on-a-Chip processors including those from Marvell (Cavium), NXP, Qualcomm, HiSilicon, Ampere, Mellanox, and Xilinx among others. SUSE Linux for Arm is already being used by customers for workloads such as the Catalyst UK High Performance Computing project with HPE. Multiple manufacturing customers are also using SUSE Linux on the Raspberry Pi for industrial IoT automation and monitoring.

SUSE as a key player in High Performance Computing where SUSE Linux is the underpinning for almost half of the TOP 100 HPC systems. SUSE has already delivered an initial set of HPC infrastructure packages such as slurm, openblas, openmpi, and fftw that are supported as part of the HPC Module, available for Arm-64 and X86-64 platforms.

This new initiative is expected to improve the maturity of ecosystems across multiple industries and simplify using new technologies such as Arm processor technology to deliver innovative High Performance and Edge Computing solutions. ­­

Press release:  http://www.fz-juelich.de/SharedDocs/Pressemitteilungen/UK/EN/2018/2018-10-10-hpc.html

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Product Management Reading List

reading_books

Recently I was asked: What Product Management books do you recommend?

As I dug through my Kindle list, I realized that most of my recommendations are less about the mechanics of product management and more about the process of creating and the right products for the right markets.

Every product manager will have their own list, but these books have been influential to my approach to product management.

Let me know what you think!

Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action

START WITH WHY shows that the leaders who’ve had the greatest influence in the world all think, act, and communicate the same way — and it’s the opposite of what everyone else does. Sinek calls this powerful idea The Golden Circle, and it provides a framework upon which organizations can be built, movements can be led, and people can be inspired. And it all starts with WHY.

Blue Ocean Strategy: How to Create Uncontested Market Space and Make the Competition Irrelevant

In this perennial bestseller, embraced by organizations and industries worldwide, globally preeminent management thinkers W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne challenge everything you thought you knew about the requirements for strategic success. Recognized as one of the most iconic and impactful strategy books ever written, Blue Ocean Strategy, now updated with fresh content from the authors, argues that cutthroat competition results in nothing but a bloody red ocean of rivals fighting over a shrinking profit pool. Based on a study of 150 strategic moves (spanning more than 100 years across 30 industries), the authors argue that lasting success comes not from battling competitors but from creating “blue oceans”—untapped new market spaces ripe for growth.

Blue Ocean Shift: Beyond Competing – Proven Steps to Inspire Confidence and Seize New Growth

BLUE OCEAN SHIFT is the essential follow up to Blue Ocean Strategy, the classic and 3.6 million copy global bestseller by world-renowned professors W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne. Drawing on more than a decade of new work, Kim and Mauborgne show you how to move beyond competing, inspire your people’s confidence, and seize new growth, guiding you step-by-step through how to take your organization from a red ocean crowded with competition to a blue ocean of uncontested market space. By combining the insights of human psychology with practical market-creating tools and real-world guidance, Kim and Mauborgne deliver the definitive guide to shift yourself, your team, or your organization to new heights of confidence, market creation, and growth. They show why nondisruptive creation is as important as disruption in seizing new growth.

Crossing the Chasm, 3rd Edition: Marketing and Selling Disruptive Products to Mainstream Customers

The bible for bringing cutting-edge products to larger markets–now revised and updated with new insights into the realities of high-tech marketing

In Crossing the Chasm, Geoffrey A. Moore shows that in the Technology Adoption Life Cycle–which begins with innovators and moves to early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards–there is a vast chasm between the early adopters and the early majority. While early adopters are willing to sacrifice for the advantage of being first, the early majority waits until they know that the technology actually offers improvements in productivity. The challenge for innovators and marketers is to narrow this chasm and ultimately accelerate adoption across every segment.

Badass: Making Users Awesome

Imagine you’re in a game with one objective: a bestselling product or service. The rules? No marketing budget, no PR stunts, and it must be sustainably successful. No short-term fads.

This is not a game of chance. It is a game of skill and strategy.

And it begins with a single question: given competing products of equal pricing, promotion, and perceived quality, why does one outsell the others?

The answer doesn’t live in the sustainably successful products or services. The answer lives in those who use them.

Our goal is to craft a strategy for creating successful users. And that strategy is full of surprising, counter-intuitive, and astonishingly simple techniques that don’t depend on a massive marketing or development budget. Techniques typically overlooked by even the most well-funded, well-staffed product teams.

The Art of Profitability

There are many ways to make profit and it is unlikely that your business does all of them. People will pay different prices for the same thing in different situations (think: Coke in the grocery store vs. Coke in a nice restaurant). Good profit models are easy to brainstorm and hard to execute.

As you read, continually re-focus on the implications for your organization. Make notes. Discuss with colleagues.

Here are some questions to get started:

  • How does profit happen for my company? For my competitors?
  • How well do all my people understand our profit models?
  • Is the organization aligned to help capitalize on them?
  • Are there new profit models that we could apply to improve profitability?
  • Which of our current initiatives could improve our profitability and should be accelerated? Which may actually impair it, and should be discontinued?
  • Which specific actions can my organization take in the next ninety days to improve our profit position

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team outlines the root causes of politics and dysfunction on the teams where you work, and the keys to overcoming them. Counter to conventional wisdom, the causes of dysfunction are both identifiable and curable. However, they don’t die easily. Making a team functional and cohesive requires levels of courage and discipline that many groups cannot seem to muster.

Youtility: Why Smart Marketing Is about Help Not Hype

The difference between helping and selling is just two letters If you’re wondering how to make your products seem more exciting online, you’re asking the wrong question. You’re not competing for attention only against other similar products. You’re competing against your customers’ friends and family and viral videos and cute puppies. To win attention these days you must ask a different question: “How can we help?” Jay Baer’s Youtility offers a new approach that cuts through the clut­ter: marketing that is truly, inherently useful. If you sell something, you make a customer today, but if you genuinely help someone, you create a customer for life.

The Art of Product Management: Lessons from a Silicon Valley Innovator

The Art of Product Management takes us inside the head of a product management thought leader. With color and humor, Rich Mironov gives us a taste of Silicon Valley’s tireless pursuit of great technology and its creation of new products. He provides strategic advice to product managers and tech professionals about start-ups, big organizations, how to think like a customer, and what things should cost. He also reminds us to love our products and our teams. The Art of Product Management brings together the best insights from more than seven years of Product Bytes, Rich Mironov’s long-running series on product strategy, technology companies, and how the two interact. This collection is for everyone who builds or markets the next new thing.

This is more a “how to think about products” book a set of templates. Product managers (and others who are deeply committed to great products) will recognize themselves and their daily process struggles. How do we think about customers and solutions? Why do organizations behave the way they do? This book captures the inner life of product champions.

The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses

The Lean Startup approach fosters companies that are both more capital efficient and that leverage human creativity more effectively. Inspired by lessons from lean manufacturing, it relies on “validated learning,” rapid scientific experimentation, as well as a number of counter-intuitive practices that shorten product development cycles, measure actual progress without resorting to vanity metrics, and learn what customers really want. It enables a company to shift directions with agility, altering plans inch by inch, minute by minute.

Rather than wasting time creating elaborate business plans, The Lean Startup offers entrepreneurs – in companies of all sizes – a way to test their vision continuously, to adapt and adjust before it’s too late. Ries provides a scientific approach to creating and managing successful startups in a age when companies need to innovate more than ever.

42 Rules of Product Marketing: Learn the Rules of Product Marketing from Leading Experts from around the World

42 Rules of Product Marketing is a collection of product marketing wisdom and insights from forty-two experts from around the world. This book will expose you to the experience and knowledge of a group of the world’s leading product marketing experts with a range of perspectives in both consumer and business markets.

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Free Developer subscriptions for SUSE Linux on Arm based systems are now available

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Arm servers are here (to stay)

I’ve spent the last few weeks meeting with many customers and partners in Frankfurt at the ISC High Performance Conference, HPCast, and the GoingArm conference. We have worked with the Arm community for many years to build a 64-bit Arm server ecosystem. As a result, SUSE has delivered three releases of SUSE Linux for Arm. Now high end 64-bit Arm servers are finally coming to market.

Vendors such as Cray, HPE, Marvell, Qualcomm, and HiSilicon are working to deliver high end Arm systems for the HPC market this year. Last month, the HPE Apollo 70 became the first 64-bit Arm server to be SUSE “YES” certified. Customer are moving beyond the evaluation phase and are starting to place orders for systems. A key example of this is the recent Sandia National Lab announcement for the “Astra” HPC cluster based on HPE Apollo 70 systems running Marvell ThunderX2 Arm processors.

Meanwhile projects such as the arm Open Source Enablement Council, Catalyst UK, GW4, WorksOnArm (hosted by Packet), OpenHPC, and Linaro HPC SIG have been working to enable and validate open source software for Arm processor-based systems.

Mature 64-bit Arm systems for industrial, IoT, networking, and software defined storage workloads are becoming broadly available. These small but capable systems are delivered by ODMs (such as Gateworks) featuring Arm processors from Marvell, NXP, Rockchip, Xilinx, and others. SUSE customers are even using the Raspberry Pi Models B and B+ for industrial automation and monitoring.

Arm based systems are attractive for workloads other than HPC or IoT. Commercial applications are available for the Arm platform from vendors such as Cadence and even Microsoft.

Free developer subscription for SUSE Linux on Arm

SUSE is supporting the development of the 64-bit Arm ecosystem by expanding our free developer subscription program to include SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for Arm.

Developers can receive a free one-year, subscription that entitles you to receive fixes and enhancements for SLES on Arm operating system. SLES for Arm runs on many popular hardware platforms including the Marvell (Cavium) ThunderX2, Qualcomm Centriq 2400, and even the Raspberry Pi 3. You can use this subscription to test, validate, and qualify your solution for SUSE Linux for Arm.

How to get started

  1. Go to the download site https://www.suse.com/subscriptions/developer/
  2. Read the information and select Arm by clicking the “Arm AArch64“ link at the top of the page
  3. You need to be logged to the SUSE Customer Center to download the media. If you do not already have a SUSE login, you can create one now.
  4. The site generates a one-year subscription key. Please copy it and save it for later. This registration key is good for both SLES 12 and SLES 15 releases.
  5. Proceed to the download page where you will find images for SLES for Arm 12 SP3. If you need a later release like SLES 15 or you want to download the SD card image for the Raspberry Pi, go to https://download.suse.com/
  6. When you install SLES for Arm, you need to use the registration key created in step #4 above to download fixes and additional packages

Where to get help

You can engage with SUSE and other developers via the SUSE forums for Arm and Raspberry Pi

Now is the right time

Customers are looking for solutions that run on 64-bit Arm platforms. Now is the time for you to start making your application available on SUSE Linux for Arm by using the free Developer Subscription for SLES for Arm (including the Raspberry Pi).

Have a lot of fun!

 

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